Ankylosing Spondylitis

Lasers Med Sci. 2016 Apr;31(3):459-69. doi: 10.1007/s10103-016-1874-2. Epub 2016 Jan 21.

LLLT for the management of patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

Stasinopoulos D1, Papadopoulos K2, Lamnisos D1, Stergioulas A3.

Author information

1
Physiotherapy Program, Department of Health Sciences, School of Sciences, European University Cyprus, Laureate International Universities, 6 Diogenes Street, 2044, Engomi, Nicosia, Cyprus.
2
Physiotherapy Program, Department of Health Sciences, School of Sciences, European University Cyprus, Laureate International Universities, 6 Diogenes Street, 2044, Engomi, Nicosia, Cyprus. kostpap@yahoo.com.
3
Lab of Health, Fitness and Disability Management, Faculty of Human Movement and Quality of Life, University of Peloponnese, Efstathiou & Stamatikis Balioti & Plateon, 231 00, Sparta, Laconia, Greece.

Abstract

This study aimed to compare the effectiveness of the combined lowlevel laser therapy (LLLT) and passive stretching with combined placebo LLLT laser and the same passive stretching exercises in patients suffering from ankylosing spondylitis. Forty-eight patients suffering from ankylosing spondylitis participated in the study and were randomized into two groups. Group A (n=24) was treated with a wavelength = 820 Ga-Al-As laser CW, with power intensity = 60 mW/cm(2), energy per point in each session = 4.5 J, total energy per session =27.0 J, in contact with specific points technique, plus passive stretching exercises. Group B (n = 24), received placebo laser plus the same passive stretching exercises. Both groups received 12 sessions of laser or placebo within 8 weeks; two sessions per week (weeks 1-4) and one session per week (weeks 5-8). Pain and function scales were completed before the treatment, at the end of the fourth and eighth week of treatment, and 8 weeks after the end of treatment (follow-up). Group A revealed a significant improvement after 8 weeks of treatment in all pain and function scales. At 8-week follow-up, the improvement remained only for the pain, while for all other function outcomes the differences were not statistically significant. The results suggested that after an 8-week treatment and after a follow-up, the combination of LLLT and passive stretching exercises decreased pain more effectively than placebo LLLT along with the same passive stretching exercises in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. Future studies are needed to establish the relative and absolute effectiveness of the above protocol.

KEYWORDS:

Ankylosing spondylitis; LLLT; Passive stretching