Plantar Fasciitis

 2019 May 20. doi: 10.1089/photob.2018.4588. [Epub ahead of print]

Parameters and Effects of Photobiomodulation in Plantar Fasciitis: A Meta-Analysis and Systematic Review.

Author information

1
1 Postgraduate Program in Rehabilitation Sciences, Universidade Nove de Julho (UNINOVE), São Paulo, Brazil.
2
2 Postgraduate Program in Biophotonics Applied to Health Sciences, Universidade Nove de Julho (UNINOVE), São Paulo, Brazil.

Abstract

Objective: This systematic review and meta-analysis updated the effects of photobiomodulation therapy (PBMT) on pain, the Foot Function Index (FFI), and the effects on fascial thickness in adults with acute or chronic plantar fasciitis (PF). Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted in the PubMed (Public/Publisher MEDLINE), EMBASE (Excerpta Medica Database), and CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature) databases. Two researchers independently screened titles and abstracts of the retrieved studies for eligibility. A random-effects model was used for this meta-analysis. Subgroup meta-analyses were conducted to evaluate the influence of PBMT in pain and foot function under investigation and the study design on the overall weighted mean effect size. Results: From a total of 3865 studies, 7 randomized controlled trials were selected after final review and 4 were selected for meta-analysis. There was a significant difference between PBMT and control for Visual Analog Scale (Chi2=29.30; p<0.00001) with an I2 value of 90% in favor of PBMT versus the control. The overall effect of PBMT was statistically significant (p<0.02) with PBMT favoring for thickness of the plantar fascia reduction. FFI between PBMT and control group [Chi2 -83.46, df=1 (p<0.00001)]; I2=99% in favor of the PBMT. Conclusions: This meta-analysis presents evidence that PBMT is an effective treatment modality to reduce pain and improvement of foot function in patients with chronic PF, however, a broad discrepancy was found in the PBMT dosimetry. The ideal treatment parameters for PF need to be elucidated.

KEYWORDS:

foot function; pain; photobiomodulation therapy; plantar fasciitis

Medicine (Baltimore). 2019 Jan;98(3):e14088. doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000014088.

Clinical efficacy of low-level laser therapy in plantar fasciitis: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Wang W1, Jiang W2, Tang C3, Zhang X1, Xiang J1.

Author information

1
Department of Rehabilitation.
2
Department of Neurology, the Affiliated Hospital of Xuzhou Medical University, Xuzhou, China.
3
Department of Neurobiology, Xuzhou Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Xuzhou Medical University, Xuzhou, China.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Emerging evidence suggests that low-level laser therapy (LLLT) for plantar fasciitis (PF) may be beneficial. However, the convincing study investigating its effectiveness for treatment of PF was scarce. Therefore, a systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted to assess whether LLLT significantly relieve pain of patients with PF.

METHODS:

PubMed, EMBASE, EBSCO, Web of Science, China Biological Medicine Database, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chinese Wan fang, and Cochrane CENTRAL were searched systematically up to March 2018.

RESULTS:

A total of 6 randomized controlled trials were included. The meta-analysis indicated that compared with control group, visual analogue scale (VAS) score significantly decreased at the end point of the treatment in LLLT group. In addition, this improvement is continued for up to 3 months. However, no significant difference was observed according to the Foot Function Index-pain subscale (FFI-p).

CONCLUSION:

This meta-analysis indicates that the LLLT in patients with PF significantly relieves the heel pain and the excellent efficacy lasts for 3 months after treatment.

Lasers Med Sci. 2018 Apr 7. doi: 10.1007/s10103-018-2497-6. [Epub ahead of print]

The effect of high-intensity versus low-level laser therapy in the management of plantar fasciitis: a randomized clinical trial.

Ordahan B1,2, Karahan AY3, Kaydok E4.

Author information

1
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Konya Education and Training Hospital, Konya, Turkey. banuordahan@gmail.com.
2
Yaz?rmah, Beyhekim State Hospital, Selçuklu, Konya, Turkey. banuordahan@gmail.com.
3
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, U?ak University, U?ak, Turkey.
4
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Ömer Halis Demir University, Ni?de, Turkey.

Abstract

We aimed to compare the efficacy of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) and high-intensity laser therapy (HILT) in the treatment of plantar fasciitis (PF). Seventy patients were randomized into either the LLLT (8 men, 27 women; mean age 48.65?±?10.81 years) or HILT (7 men, 28 women; mean age 48.73?±?11.41 years) groups. LLLT (904 nm) and HILT (1064 nm) were performed three times per week, over a period of 3 weeks. Each treatment combined with silicone insole and stretching exercises. Patients’ pain and functional status were evaluated with Visual Analog Scale, Heel Tenderness Index, and Foot and Ankle Outcome Score before and after treatment. A chi-square test was performed to compare demographic and clinical characteristics. Within-group and between-group differences were also investigated. Paired samples t test was used to analyze the differences between baseline and after treatment values, while independent samples t test was used to compare the two groups. Both groups contained similar demographic characteristics including age, sex, and body mass index (all p?>?0.05). Three and two patients in the HILT and LLLT group, respectively, were lost to follow-up. At the study onset, there were no statistically significant differences between the two groups in the Visual Analog Scale, Heel Tenderness Index, and Foot And Ankle Outcome Scores. Three weeks later, both groups showed significant improvement in all parameters (p?<?0.05). The HILT group demonstrated better improvement in all parameters than the LLLT group. Although both treatments improved the pain levels, function, and quality of life in patients with PF, HILT had a more significant effect than LLLT.

Foot Ankle Int. 2014 Feb 7. [Epub ahead of print]

LowLevel Laser Therapy for the Treatment of Chronic Plantar Fasciitis: A Prospective Study.

Jastifer JR1, Catena F, Doty JF, Stevens F, Coughlin MJ.

Author information

  • 1Saint Alphonsus Coughlin Foot & Ankle Clinic, Boise, ID, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Plantar fasciitis affects nearly 1 million people annually in the United States. Traditional nonoperative management is successful in about 90% of patients, usually within 10 months. Chronic plantar fasciitis develops in about 10% of patients and is a difficult clinical problem to treat. A newly emerging technology, lowlevel laser therapy (LLLT), has demonstrated promising results for the treatment of acute and chronic pain.

METHODS:

Thirty patients were administered LLLT and completed 12 months of follow-up. Patients were treated twice a week for 3 weeks for a total of 6 treatments and were evaluated at baseline, 2 weeks post procedure, and 6 and 12 months post procedure. Patients completed the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and Foot Function Index (FFI) at study follow-up periods.

RESULTS:

Patients demonstrated a mean improvement in heel pain VAS from 67.8 out of 100 at baseline to 6.9 out of 100 at the 12-month follow-up period. Total FFI score improved from a mean of 106.2 at baseline to 32.3 at 12 months post procedure.

CONCLUSION:

Although further studies are warranted, this study shows that LLLT is a promising treatment of chronic plantar fasciitis.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE:

Level 4, case series.

 

Lasers Med Sci. 2009 Oct 20. [Epub ahead of print]

Ultrasonographic evaluation of plantar fasciitis after low-level laser therapy: results of a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

Kiritsi O, Tsitas K, Malliaropoulos N, Mikroulis G.

Prognosis, Diagnostic Center, Larnaca, Zaka 56, 56727, Thessaloniki, Greece, kirolga@hotmail.com.

The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on plantar fasciitis documented by the ultrasonographic appearance of the aponeurosis and by patients’ pain scores. Thirty individuals with diagnosis of unilateral plantar fasciitis were enrolled in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, but 25 participants completed the therapeutic protocol. The contralateral asymptomatic fascia was used as control. After enrolment, symptomatic individuals were randomly assigned to receive LLLT, or identical placebo, for 6 weeks. Ultrasonography was performed at baseline and after completion of therapy. The subjective subcalcaneal pain was recorded at baseline and after treatment on a visual analogue scale (VAS). After LLLT, plantar fascia thickness in both groups showed significant change over the experimental period and there was a difference (before treatment and after treatment) in plantar fascia thickness between the two groups. However, plantar fascia thickness was insignificant (mean 3.627 +/- 0.977 mm) when compared with that in the placebo group (mean 4.380 +/- 1.0042 mm). Pain estimation on the visual analogue scale had improved significantly in all test situations (after night rest, daily activities) after LLLT when compared with that of the placebo group. (P = 0.006 and P = 0.01, respectively). Additionally, when the difference in pain scores was compared between the two groups, the change was statistically significant (after night rest P = 0.000; daily activities P = 0.001). In summary, while ultrasound imaging is able to depict the morphologic changes related to plantar fasciitis, 904 nm gallium-arsenide (GaAs) infrared laser may contribute to healing and pain reduction in plantar fasciitis.

Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 1998 Mar;79(3):249-54.

A randomized controlled evaluation of low-intensity laser therapy: plantar fasciitis.

Basford JR, Malanga GA, Krause DA, Harmsen WS.

Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, MN 55905, USA.

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether low-intensity laser irradiation, a widespread but controversial physical therapy agent, is an effective treatment of plantar fasciitis.DESIGN: A randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical study.

SETTING: A sports medicine clinic.

SUBJECTS: Thirty-two otherwise healthy individuals with plantar fasciitis of more than 1 month’s duration.

INTERVENTION: Dummy or active irradiation with a 30 mW .83 microm GaAlAs continuous-wave infrared (IR) diode laser three times a week for 4 weeks.

MEASUREMENTS: Morning pain, pain with toe walking, tenderness to palpation, windlass test response, medication consumption, and orthotic use were evaluated immediately before the study, as well as at the midpoint and end of treatment. Subjects were also evaluated at a follow-up 1 month after their last treatment.

RESULTS: No significant differences were found between the groups in any of the outcome measures either during treatment or at the 1-month follow-up. Treatment, however, was well tolerated and side effects were minimal.

CONCLUSIONS: Low-intensity IR laser therapy appears safe but, at least within the parameters of this study, is not beneficial in the treatment of plantar fasciitis.